Creation Care

God made the heavens and the earth and it was good.
Genesis 1:1-31

Pope Francis in his encyclical Laudato Si tells us,

“The Earth and all life on it are part of God’s creation.  We are called to respect this gift.  

We are responsible for taking care of the world we live in and for sharing all the wonders and resources the earth gives us.”

Creation Care Team

We show our respect for the Creator by our stewardship of creation

In response to this St Joseph Parish has formed a Creation Care Team, which calls us all to the responsibility for taking care of God’s creation.  The Creation Care Team strives to:

Raise awareness of the climate crisis

Express gratitude and respect for God’s gift of creation

Encourage actions that help to ease the burdens that we have placed upon the Earth and on those most vulnerable

For More Information Contact:

Mary Sargent at:  msargent1@wi.rr.com for questions or to join.

Care for the earth  is not just an Earth Day slogan, it is a requirement of our faith.

We are called to protect people and the planet, living our faith in relationship with all of God’s creation.

This environmental challenge has fundamental moral and ethical dimensions that cannot be ignored.

I'm Only a Kid

Laudato Si for Children

From the Vatican: A Reflection

Breaking Down Laudato Si

Scripture

  • Genesis 1:1-31 – God made the heavens and the earth and it was  good.
  • Genesis 2:15 – Humans are commanded to care for God’s creation.
  • Leviticus 25:1-7 – The land itself must be given a rest and not abused.
  • Daniel 3:56-82 – Creation proclaims the glory of God.
  • Romans 1:20 – Creation reveals the nature of God.
  • 1 Corinthians 10:26 – Creation and all  created things are inherently good because they are of the Lord.

The connection between our faith and the environment

We show  our respect for the Creator by our stewardship of creation. Care for the earth  is not just an Earth Day slogan, it is a requirement of our faith. We are  called to protect people and the planet, living our faith in relationship with  all of God’s creation. This environmental challenge has fundamental moral and  ethical dimensions that cannot be ignored. (USCCB)

“The relationship between human activity and global warming must be constantly monitored for “the climate is a good that must be protected”.”
Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church, #470

“Creation is not a property, which we can rule over at will; or, even less, is the property of only a few: Creation is a gift, it is a wonderful gift that God has given us, so that we care for it and we use it for the benefit of all, always with great respect and gratitude.”
~ Pope Francis

From the USCCB’s blog TO GO FORTH, an article on Pope Francis’ Encyclical Laudato Siconnecting Care for Creation and our Gospel Mission:

In linking respect for human life and dignity with care for the natural world, Pope Francis follows in the footsteps of both Pope Benedict XVI and St. John Paul II, who noted that “respect for life and for the dignity of the human person extends also to the rest of creation, which is called to join man in praising God” (Message for the 1990 World Day of Peace).

The efforts of all three are rooted in Scripture and longstanding Catholic teachings. Those teachings remind us that when we don’t responsibly care for God’s creation, it’s the poor who suffer most.  Pollution, food and water insecurity, and conflicts over declining resources first affect those on the margins – “the least of these” Jesus entrusts to our particular care. There’s an “intimate relationship between the poor and the fragility of the planet” (LS, no. 16), and we have a responsibility to live out our solidarity with the poor in concrete ways.